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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
security and medicare, make some defense cuts if you have to but we'd rather just see the rich get taxed and the near rich get taxed if we have to do that. >> the numbers do not add up, the left is being fundamentally dishonest. they are saying you don't have to cut social security or medicare or medicaid to get the deficit down, all you've got to do is tax the rich some more. they are recklessly suggesting that we go deeper and deeper and deeper into debt heading towards bankruptcy. the numbers, megyn are stunning. we have an unfunded liability for medicare of $42 trillion. an unfunded liability for social security of $20 trillion. and a further 20 trillion for unfunded pensions for federal employees, that adds up to $86 trillion which are committed to pay in the future and the money we do not have. therefore, you cannot just tax the rich to get rid of the deficit. you simply can't do that. the numbers don't add up. megyn: chris, what do you make of this, the president is now going to go out on what looks like sort of like a campaign stop on friday to pennsylvania. he already had this m
of the things that the health sector and energy sector and even defense has learned, when you get ahead of it, you can help the to shape the conversation the way you can't if you're on the back end responding. back end responding in any context you're at the bottom of that conversation. >> you work directly with teachers. given the tenor of the conversation around for-profits i have got to suspect many. teachers you reach out to or come into contact with probably have mixed feelings about for-profits. what kind of reception has learnzillion gotten and how do you drive the conversation the way jim suggested where it is about focusing on what serves kids well and alleviating concerns in that kind of framework? >> yee. actually let me start with the second part and move to the first part because i think what jim's jim is pointing out in terms of incentives the government plays an important role. if there is threat of that sort of response from the government, i think that that in itself then creates incentives for different actors within the industry to act differently. one thing interesting fro
. and then came the 1980s and the tax cuts of ronald reagan combined with greater defense spending leading to hugely higher annual deficits covered by borrowing. and thus again a swelling nationa debt. but with no wars at all. then under presidents george h.w. bush and bill clinton we took action. for a while, both parties agreed, says simon johnson. >> there was a bipartisan agreement to raise revenue and put something of a damper on spending. so that's an important moment in the bigger picture, of course, that was just a small hesitation on the part of a much larger national debt. >> reporter: because in the bigger picture, a president just can't accomplish very much if he's cutting spending and won't raise taxes. and so yet again, more borrowing. under presidents george w. bush and barack obama. higher deficits and debt that, because of the graying baby boom, are fated to get even worse. >> the population was always going to age, the baby boomers were going to retire. they were paying a lot of social security contributions in 1990s. we were always going to shift into structural deficit
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)